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Troy Terry a sophomore forward from the University of Denver, who grew up in the Mile High City, became a USA Hockey legend on Wednesday. His performance in the World Junior Championship’s semifinal game (Hockey’s international under 20 tournament) won’t be forgotten anytime soon.

The United States faced Russia for the chance at gold in the WJC and the score remained locked at three after regulation time. A scoreless overtime led to a shootout. It’s key to note that NHL shootouts are different from IIHF (Intentional Ice Hockey Federation) shootouts. IIHF shootouts are five shooters long, and if more shooters are needed, a team is able to to reuse a player as many times as they want. This notably happened with Jonathan Toews in the 2007 tournament and T.J. Oshie in the 2014 Winter Olympics.

A goal by Russia started the shootout and the score held at 1-0 Russia after three rounds. Terry was the Americans fourth shooter, he cashed:

That goal was essential as Russia answered right back and would’ve won it had Terry not scored.

With the Americans down 2-1 it looked like it might be over. They needed a score and a stop in the fifth to extend it to extra rounds.

Jeremy Bracco provided the score to tie it at two, Tyler Parsons added the stop. The game went to sudden death shootout.

The Americans called on the Pioneer Terry, who scored in the fourth. He put the puck between the pipes with his slick dangling.

But Russia answered right back in the sixth and the game was onto the seventh round of the shootout.

The Americans called on Terry once more. Seeking his third goal of the shootout he went forehand-backhand-five hole to win it for the Americans and send them to the gold medal game.

For a kid that dreamed about just taking the ice at Magness Arena, Terry at age 19 has already become a part of USA Hockey history.

Troy Terry and United States will play either Canada or Sweden in the gold medal game on Jan. 5 at 8 p.m. ET in the Bell Centre in Montreal

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Jake Shapiro

Since he was a teenager Jake has been a credentialed reporter, now he works on the Colorado Buffaloes and Colorado Rockies beats for BSN Denver. Shap was discovered by a BSN Denver employee while picking a fight in Beer League Softball—despite his five-foot-three frame—earning him respect and a job. He does play-by-play on the radio for all CU games, and studied Journalism at the University of Colorado. Follow him on Twitter @Shapalicious.