“Aqib Talib’s patience.”

“Bradley Roby’s tenacity.”

“Chris Harris’ feet.”

The perfect corner? Well, basically.

Denver Broncos third-round pick Brendan Langley was put on the spot shortly after he was selected by the team in the third round of the 2017 NFL Draft. The question: if you could take one thing from each of the Broncos top corners, what would it be?

Langley’s answer was swift and confident, almost too swift and confident. How did he have that answer so ready?

“I only watch these guys,” he told BSN Denver with an honest whisper, almost as if he was embarrassed about how much tape he had watched of his new teammates. “That’s it. Those are the only guys I watch when we’re talking about trying to take things and emulate my game after certain people, those are the four guys, these three and Patrick Peterson.”

A lot of players stand on a podium in front of their new team’s local media and tell everybody that it was their dream to play there. With Langley, though, it’s different. It wasn’t about being a local kid or a childhood memory of the Orange & Blue; it was about wanting to play alongside his idols, the best of the best.

“Denver, it’s safe to say now, was my team of choice,” he explained. “Being able to work with guys like Talib and Chris Harris—it’s not often you get two All-Pro corners on the same team. Not to mention Bradley Roby, who if he weren’t playing behind those two guys, he’d be an All-Pro as well. I think being able to learn from those guys is going to be the key factor in taking my game to the next level. I don’t think it’ll be any of the physical attributes. Mentally, I have to get on their level. For the most part, it’s going to be learning from them. That’s what’s going to take my game to the next level.”

Much like his favorite attributes of each player, Langley already has his lesson plan prepared.

“Teach me your study habits.”

“Show me how to be a professional.”

“Show me how to be here on time, 30 minutes, 40 minutes early.”

“Show me how you take care of your body.

“I think when I put all of that together, I’ll be the next All-Pro,” he added. “I don’t think there’s anything physically that I can do here at this point that’s going to take me to the next level, I’ve done all of that. I think what’s going to take me to the next level is learning from those guys.”

For a guy who transferred from Georgia to Lamar because of a lack of playing time, it’s a bit odd all of the sudden Brendan Langley is excited to ride the bench. Maybe in another situation, he would have been more eager to cover somebody out on the field, for now, though he’s going to play the role of sponge.

“I just want to be able to contribute however I can. From what I’m hearing and what I feel like, I think I’ll contribute in the [special]teams game, especially returning punts early on, more so than defense. I’ll have a chance to learn at defense, learn behind those guys. ”

Learning from the ‘No Fly Zone’ won’t be hard for the Lamar University product, he’s been doing that for years, some of the other stuff, though, that might take some getting used to.

“I was just watching his film this week, and now we’re texting each other,” he said of Aqib Talib. “It’s surreal.”

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Ryan Koenigsberg

In 2012, at the age of 20, Ryan became a credentialed reporter covering University of Colorado Athletics. . . despite wearing a wolf-tee to his interview.
A native of Boulder and a graduate of the university, he attended his 100th-consecutive Colorado Football home game in 2015.
Later in 2015, Ryan began spearheading the Broncos coverage here at BSN Denver, riding that wave all the way to San Francisco, where he covered his first Super Bowl.
Now 24, it seems ‘RK’ is trying to make up for that whole wolf-tee thing by overdressing at every event. He apologizes in advance for any cringe-worthy puns.