BSN NFL Stat Glossary

DPR – DYNAMIC PLAYER RATING

DPR is a proprietary metric on a scale of 0 to 100. The football version has 10 different variations: quarterbacks, running backs and fullbacks, tight ends, wide receivers, offensive linemen, defensive linemen, edge rushers, off-ball linebackers, safeties, and cornerbacks.

Unlike other advanced all-encompassing stats like WAR, this is a per-game stat, and thus, takes into account statistics that are measured on a game-by-game basis, including many of our in-house stats that you’ll find below.

Our DPR grading scale is the following:

95 or higher =

94-90 = A+

89-85 = A

84-80 = A-

79-75 = B+

74-70 = B

69-65 = B-

64-60 = C+

59-55 = C

54-50 = C-

49-45 = D+

44-40 = D

39-35 = D-

34 or lower = F

Think of our grading scale as the temperature in Fahrenheit—anything above a 100 is rare and signifies a truly special performance, while anything below 30 is shockingly bad.

It’s important to understand that it would be very hard to average anything above a 90, over the course of an entire season, as production would truly have to be historical.

Even then, like in the case of Calvin Johnson’s 2012 season, where he set the record for receiving yards in a season with 1,964, his DPR was a 78.23. Johnson’s yards might’ve been record-breaking, but he was also targeted a ton, hauling in only 59.8 percent of those targets, while only scoring five touchdowns. This is a perfect example of how DPR takes into account all statistical aspects of a player’s performance and production.

There’s no way to break or stump DPR either, as it allows for games above 100 or below 0.

Below is a breakdown of what statistics are taken into account for the 10 different variations of our Football DPR. Mind you, all variations weigh different statistical categories differently, based on the specific position.

Quarterbacks

QB DPR takes into account 18 stats: completions, pass attempts, completion percentage, passing yards, touchdowns, interceptions, sacks, yards per attempt, QB rating, rushing yards, rushing touchdowns, fumbles, fumbles lost, two-point conversions, red-zone percentage, the percentage of first-down conversions on 3rd-and-short, 3rd-and-medium and 3rd-and-long.

The volume of passes a quarterback is asked to take can factor in heavily, and efficiency is key here as well, especially in crucial situations like the red zone and on third down. Third downs are weighed differently in relation to how long the down-and-distance is.

Of course, avoiding negative plays like sacks or turnovers also plays a big role here.

Running backs

RB DPR takes into account 11 different statistics (up to 15 for backs that qualify): rushing attempts, rushing yards, yards per attempt, rushing touchdowns, receiving yards, receiving touchdowns, two-point conversions, red-zone yards, percentage of snaps played, fumbles and fumbles lost. The stat also accounts for players who impact the return game, with return yards and touchdowns on kickoffs or punts factored in for players that qualify.

This position is all about production and impacting the scoreboard.

Wide receivers

WR DPR takes into account 11 different statistics (up to 15 for those that qualify): receptions, receiving yards, targets, reception percentage, yards per reception, yards per target, touchdowns scored, red zone receptions, percentage of snaps played, rushing yards, rushing touchdowns, fumbles and fumbles lost. The stat also accounts for players who impact the return game, with return yards and touchdowns on kickoffs or punts factored in for players that qualify.

Production is key for this position, as well as being impactful and efficient with the targets that go their way.

Tight ends

TE DPR takes into account 15 different statistics: receptions, receiving yards, targets, reception percentage, yards per reception, yards per target, touchdowns, red zone receptions, the percentage of snaps played, holding penalties, false starts, tackles for a loss allowed, sacks allowed, run stops allowed and sack yards.

Being impactful in the receiving game is crucial here, but it’s also important to not be a liability as a blocker.

Offensive linemen

Given the lack of stats for offensive linemen, every statistic that’s utilized for our OL DPR was developed in-house: tackles for a loss allowed, run stops allowed, sacks allowed, sack yards, strip sacks allowed, holding penalties and false starts.

Much like a pitcher or a goalie in hockey, all the stats are negative, so maintaining a clean sheet is crucial in having a high rating.

Defensive linemen

DL DPR is for interior defensive linemen, meaning nose tackles, defensive ends in a 3-4, and defensive tackles in a 4-3.

This variation of the metric takes into account 14 stats: solo tackles, assisted tackles, tackles for a loss, run stuffs, assisted run stuffs, sacks, sack yards, quarterback hits, quarterback hurries, forced fumbles, fumbles recovered, touchdowns, interceptions and percentage of snaps played.

Run stuffs count a lot here, as does creating pressure on the quarterback. Well-rounded interior defenders who are stout against the run and are menacing rushers inside, are going to get the highest ratings.

Edge rushers

EDGE DPR accounts for defensive ends in a 4-3 and outside linebackers in a 3-4, these are your highly-paid pass rushers coming off the edge.

This DPR takes into account 14 statistical categories: solo tackles, assisted tackles, tackles for a loss, run stuffs, assisted run stuffs, sacks, sack yards, quarterback hits, quarterback hurries, forced fumbles, fumbles recovered, touchdowns, interceptions and percentage of snaps played.

The statistical categories are the same as for the DL DPR, but impacting the quarterback matters a lot more than tackles or run stuffs.

Off-ball linebackers

Off-ball linebackers per DPR are linebackers who play inside in a 3-4, or just about anywhere in a 4-3.

This variation of our metric takes into account 18 different statistics: solo tackles, assisted tackles, tackles for a loss, run stuffs, assisted run stuffs, sacks, sack yards, quarterback hits, quarterback hurries, forced fumbles, fumbles recovered, touchdowns, interceptions, percentage of snaps played, receptions allowed, receiving percentage allowed, receiving yards allowed and receiving touchdowns allowed.

Linebackers have to do a lot. It’s important impact the run and be strong in coverage from the position. Of course, tackles count a lot here—mind you, every solo tackle counts twice as much as an assisted tackle.

Safeties

Safety DPR takes into account 20 different stats: solo tackles, assisted tackles, tackles for a loss, run stuffs, assisted run stuffs, sacks, sack yards, quarterback hits, quarterback hurries, forced fumbles, fumbles recovered, touchdowns, interceptions, percentage of snaps played, receptions allowed, receiving percentage allowed, receiving yards allowed, receiving touchdowns allowed, pass deflections and yards per target.

Much like linebackers, being a well-rounded safety that’s not a liability in any one aspect of the game matters a lot here. However, being strong in coverage and not conceding big plays is what matters most.

Cornerback

CB DPR takes into account 20 different stats: solo tackles, assisted tackles, tackles for a loss, run stuffs, assisted run stuffs, sacks, sack yards, quarterback hits, quarterback hurries, forced fumbles, fumbles recovered, touchdowns, interceptions, percentage of snaps played, receptions allowed, receiving percentage allowed, receiving yards allowed, receiving touchdowns allowed, pass deflections and yards per target.

The stats are the same as those for safeties, but all the coverage stats matter the most here.

Not allowing receptions, receiving yards or touchdowns is crucial here. Efficiency in coverage, when targeted, is also factored in positively, though players who are lockdown cornerbacks and aren’t targeted at all are also rewarded. Playing a large number of snaps is especially important in such cases.

UNIQUE BSN STATS & TABLE OF CONTENTS

Offensive stats

Third down conversions

This isn’t simply completing a third-down pass short of the sticks, a first down must be converted for a completion to be credited here.

We track 3rd-and-short (within one to two yards), 3rd-and-medium (within three to seven yards), and 3rd-and-long (eight yards or more).

Tackles for a loss allowed (TFL A)

Is fairly self-explanatory, if an offensive lineman or blocker is responsible for giving up a tackle for a loss of yards.

Run stops allowed

If a run is stopped within the first two yards due to a block breaking down that counts as a run stop allowed.

Sacks allowed

This is also fairly self-explanatory, a sack allowed occurs when a blocker is responsible for a QB being sacked. These can be shared and are given as 0.5 sacks allowed.

Sack yards

We also track how many yards were given up by a blocker on the sack they allowed.

Strip sacks allowed

If a sack is allowed where the defender strips the ball ,we also track that.

Holding and false starts penalties

Penalties are important, especially for linemen. We track holding penalties and false starts. Holding penalties count almost as much as a sack in the OL DPR.

Defensive stats

Run stuffs

Much like a run stop allowed, run stuffs are produced by defenders who stop a run in its tracks for two yards or less.

Assisted run stuffs (AST RS)

Like tackles, where there can be solo or assisted tackles, run stuffs can also be assisted.

 Quarterback hurries

A quarterback hurry is when pressure by a defender makes it so that the QB isn’t able to set his feet due to oncoming pressure, or forces a quarterback to reset his feet or bring down the ball. The pressure must arrive within the first three seconds after the ball is snapped.

Targets (TGTS)

This is simply when the ball is thrown to a receiver who the defender was covering, completion or not.

Receptions, Receiving yards, and Receiving TDs allowed

This is fairly simple, if a defender in coverage allows a reception, they are credited with a reception, we track how many yards they allowed, and if a touchdown was conceded as well.

QB pressures

QB hurries + QB hits + sacks.

% of receptions per target

This is simply how many receptions a defender allowed out of the total times he was targeted. For example, 10 receptions out of 10 targets is 100-percent, five receptions on 10 targets is 50-percent.

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