However slimy Game of Thrones’ Petyr Baelish seems, there’s no denying his wisdom about self preservation. “Fight every battle, always, everywhere, in your mind,” the man nicknamed Littlefinger instructs Sansa Stark in season seven. Denver Nuggets shooting guard Malik Beasley is only 21, but he seems to have internalized that advice during an uncertain offseason.

“I don’t know what’s going to happen,” Beasley said Wednesday. “I could get traded. I could be in the second unit. Either way I’m going to be working hard. Summer League is on my mind right now. I’m going to worry about that. And when the time comes I can prove to them that I can be a backup shooting guard.”

Beasley understands there are minutes up for grabs at backup shooting guard with Will Barton likely moving into the starting lineup after the Nuggets dealt Wilson Chandler to the 76ers. He is also aware he might not be in the Nuggets’ plans at all next season, which is perhaps a healthy mindset in a league where there are only a handful of untouchable players.

Beasley is prepared for any outcome. In the meantime, the third-year guard is putting in the work to give himself the best chance to succeed.

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Christian Clark
Author

Christian Clark is an Arlington, Texas, native who covers the Denver Nuggets for BSN Denver. Education: I graduated from the Missouri School of Journalism in December 2014 with an emphasis in print and digital news. Career: My work has been featured in the Fort Worth-Star Telegram, The Oklahoman and Columbia Missourian, and online at TexasFootball.com and Denverite.com. I came aboard at BSN Denver in November. Most memorable sports moment: Game 2 of the 2011 NBA Finals. The finest sports book I’ve ever read: Friday Night Lights by Buzz Bissinger. One sports movie I can’t live without: Tin Cup, do not @ me Most memorable experience as a reporter: Covering the Missouri football team’s boycott in 2015. It led to University of Missouri system president Tim Wolfe’s resignation and had so many other ripple effects. The sport that started it all: Basketball. My sports-watching memories kick in with those early-2000s Dallas Mavericks teams. They had bad hair and scored a lot of points. Shout-out to Nellie Ball.